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Wayne Post
My name is Sherry and I love to observe the wildlife that lives in the woods, swamps and streams that surround Canandaigua Lake.
Blue Jay
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About this blog
By Sherry Widmer
My name is Sherry and I love to observe the wildlife that lives in the woods, swamps and streams that surround Canandaigua Lake. I am especially fond of raptors (bald eagles and hawks), herons, turtles, foxes, beavers and well, you get the picture. ...
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Wildlife Musings from around Canandaigua Lake
My name is Sherry and I love to observe the wildlife that lives in the woods, swamps and streams that surround Canandaigua Lake. I am especially fond of raptors (bald eagles and hawks), herons, turtles, foxes, beavers and well, you get the picture. In this blog I would like to share some of my wildlife observations with you, as well as give you some more detailed information on the animals themselves. Im hoping that you will all contribute some of your observations and sightings as well.
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Sept. 5, 2014 8:45 a.m.
Aug. 13, 2014 10:45 a.m.
By Sherry Widmer
Nov. 18, 2013 6:17 p.m.

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The Blue Jay is a large songbird with blue, white and black plumage above and white underneath. He has a blue crest that he lowers when he is calm and raises to indicate an aggressive state. The Blue Jay also communicates with a variety of loud and sometimes raucous calls that carry a long distance. It has been said that a Blue Jay will sometimes mimic the sound of a hawk to scare other birds away from food sources. Blue Jays live on the forest edges near oak trees.

Blue Jays eat insects, nuts, seeds and berries but have a special fondness for acorns. They are able to stuff up to three acorns in a gular pouch in their throat; carry another nut in their mouth and a fifth in their beak. They will then carry these food treasures to a cache and eat them at a later time. The Blue Jay will hold an acorn in his feet and peck at it to break it open.

Blue Jays build their nests in trees 10-25 above the ground. The male gathers twigs for the nest but the female usually builds it. Only the female incubates the eggs. The male feeds her as she sits on the nest. Blue Jays often mate for life.

Blue Jays also frequent backyard feeders and make a colorful addition to the Winter landscape.

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