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Wayne Post
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Don’t peel it
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Tips on entertaining, new product reviews, simple recipes and more from GateHouse News Service. Learn about nutrition, new and \x34trendy\x34 foods you may see at the market, and food and cooking vocabulary. Take our weekly quiz and get a weekly ...
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Food for Thought
Tips on entertaining, new product reviews, simple recipes and more from GateHouse News Service. Learn about nutrition, new and \x34trendy\x34 foods you may see at the market, and food and cooking vocabulary. Take our weekly quiz and get a weekly cookbook review.
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Apple peels may help prevent cancer. Lab research has found that whole apples have a much greater effect on cancer cells than peeled ones, probably because of the antioxidants in the skin.
Dec. 17, 2013 12:20 p.m.



Tip of the Week



When you remove the peel or skin from fruits and vegetables, you lose a lot of nutrition — it's a concentrated source of fiber, vitamins, minerals and potentially beneficial phytochemicals.



Here are some facts you might not know about peels, from the University of California, Berkeley Wellness Letter:







1. The pigments in produce are healthful and the peels or skins are often the most colorful part.







2. Vegetable peels or skins are particularly good sources of insoluble fiber, which helps prevent constipation. Some peels, notably apple, are rich in pectin, a soluble fiber that helps lower blood cholesterol and control blood sugar.







3. Apple peels may help prevent cancer. Lab research has found that whole apples have a much greater effect on cancer cells than peeled ones, probably because of the antioxidants in the skin.







4. Potato skins have far more fiber, iron, potassium and B vitamins than the flesh. Potato skins are also rich in antioxidants.







5. You don't need to wash fruits and vegetables in soap or detergent — plain water is fine. It will remove nearly all dirt, as well as bacteria and some pesticide residues, if any, on the surface. Scrub firmer produce like potatoes with a vegetable brush. The wax on cucumbers, apples, tomatoes and eggplants is harmless.



— Charlyn Fargo, Creators Syndicate

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