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Wayne Post
My name is Sherry and I love to observe the wildlife that lives in the woods, swamps and streams that surround Canandaigua Lake.
Junco - Harbinger of Winter
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About this blog
By Sherry Widmer
My name is Sherry and I love to observe the wildlife that lives in the woods, swamps and streams that surround Canandaigua Lake. I am especially fond of raptors (bald eagles and hawks), herons, turtles, foxes, beavers and — well, you get the picture. ...
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Wildlife Musings from around Canandaigua Lake
My name is Sherry and I love to observe the wildlife that lives in the woods, swamps and streams that surround Canandaigua Lake. I am especially fond of raptors (bald eagles and hawks), herons, turtles, foxes, beavers and — well, you get the picture. In this blog I would like to share some of my wildlife observations with you, as well as give you some more detailed information on the animals themselves. I’m hoping that you will all contribute some of your observations and sightings as well.
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July 3, 2014 8:10 p.m.
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June 1, 2014 4:55 p.m.
By Sherry Widmer
Dec. 19, 2013 10:02 a.m.

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Believe it or not, there are some “snow birds” that actually migrate “to” our area for the Winter. The Junco is one of those brave souls. The Junco is a medium sized sparrow that lives and breeds in coniferous and mixed-coniferous forests in Canada and moves South to the woodlands and fields in our area for the Winter. Juncos have a gray body with a bright white belly and a long notched tail with white outer tail feathers. In flight, the Junco flaps its wings continuously and “pumps” its tail causing the white outer tail feathers to flash open. It has been observed that the females actually prefer males who show more white in the tail. One of their distinguishing sounds is a high “chip” note that they make when foraging or flying. I found this Junco nestled back into a hedge on the edge of a field. He was eating some wild grapes. In general Juncos eat seeds and small fruits, but in breeding season they add protein in the form of beetles, butterflies, caterpillars, ants, wasps and flies. When foraging on the ground, Juncos hop from place to place, pecking and scratching at the leaves in their search for food.

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