Tip of the Week
No matter where you live, spring travel is synonymous with the search for warm weather. While the sunshine may help keep the blues at bay, it takes more than just golden rays to make a trip unforgettable.
Whether you’re taking a family vacation, a couples escape or a getaway with friends, these insider tips will help you plan a successful trip:
Look for deals at well-known destinations
The best trips happen when you find a destination that everyone loves and you stay on budget. Start by researching areas that have something for everyone so no one feels left out.
Once you determine your destination, dig in to find the deal that’s right for you. Some hotels and resorts offer themed packages that also provide deep discounts on museum tickets, concerts and other special events. Or you can make your own trip, allowing each member of your party to pick their favorite must-see attraction.

Try something new

It’s important to enjoy some R&R, but also make time to try something new on your trip. This will take you outside your comfort zone, which can stimulate the mind in new and exciting ways. What’s more, it’s how you create lasting memories.
With growing interest in adventure travel, many destinations are offering exciting and fun experiences for all age groups.

Embrace experiential eating

Eating is one of the best ways to truly experience what makes a destination unique, so be sure to eat like a local, and maybe even fish like one, too. Eating turns into a memorable experience when you’ve helped catch your main dish. Sign up for a shrimping, crabbing or a deep-sea fishing excursion and enjoy an adventure plus a delectable meal.
If you’d rather avoid the open sea, you’re not out of luck. Seek out restaurants that source ingredients locally. That could mean eateries that boast a farm-to-table or sea-to-table experience so you enjoy the freshest fare available.

Become a history buff

Virtually anywhere you go in the United States, you’ll discover a fascinating history of how it came to be. When you make time to explore museums, walk stunning gardens and visit memorials, you’ll be able tell tales back home that you would otherwise have never known.
For an insider’s glimpse into history, check out National Historic Landmarks. In addition to beautiful scenery, you’ll experience the heritage of the area up close.

These four steps will help you plan a vacation that your travel crew will be raving about long after you return home. Best yet, you’ll have memories that will last a lifetime.

— Brandpoint

Family Movie Night
“The Boss Baby ”
Rated: PG
Length: 97 minutes
Synopsis: A suit-wearing briefcase-carrying baby pairs up with his seven-year old brother to stop the dastardly plot of the CEO of Puppy Co.

Book Report
“We’re All Wonders”
Ages: 4 to 8
Pages: 32
Synopsis: August Pullman was born with a facial difference that, up until now, has prevented him from going to a mainstream school. Palacio shows readers what it’s like to live in Auggie’s world—a world in which he feels like any other kid, but he’s not always seen that way. Auggie’s story taps into every child’s longing to belong, and to be seen for who they truly are. It’s the perfect way for families and educators to talk about empathy and kindness with young children.

— Knopf Books for Young Readers

Did You Know
According to a new study published in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, many pregnant women don’t eat healthy enough despite eating for two. This is a problem as a healthy diet during pregnancy reduces a mother’s risks of preterm birth, fetal growth restrictions and pre-eclampsia, the researchers said. “Our findings mirror national nutrition and dietary trends. The diet-quality gap among non-pregnant people is thought to be a consequence of many factors, including access to and price of healthy foods, knowledge of a healthy diet, and pressing needs that may take priority over a healthy diet,” said Lisa Bodnar, the study’s author. She associate professor of obstetrics, gynecology and reproductive sciences at the University of Pittsburgh’s School of Medicine.

— More Content Now