Victor-Farmington Rotary Club continued its 16-year tradition at a recent meeting when club members skipped the traditional luncheon speaker’s program and put together over 100 Easter baskets for the children at Wilson Commencement Park in Rochester.

The Marie C. and Joseph C. Wilson Foundation established WCP in 1991 to help low-income, single-parent families transition from public assistance to financial independence and personal self-sufficiency. WCP is a self-contained community where residents can live for 24 months in attractive, affordable housing and receive comprehensive care management, educational and life skills support, career development assistance and eventual placement in permanent housing.

Victor-Farmington Rotary coordinates basket assembly with WCP, who provides information concerning the total number of children who will receive baskets as well as a breakdown between boy and girl recipients. Provisions are also made for sugar-free candy in baskets going to children with medical issues.

Each basket contained stuffed animal babies, candy, grass, plastic eggs, toys for both boys and girls and a note of greeting from the club. Rotarians provide the candy, and the club receives donations from local merchants for the toys and baskets.

The project was initiated in 2003 by the late Betty Powers, who had initiated a similar project in Massachusetts before moving to Victor. Her husband, Galen Powers, is in charge of the club’s project and personally delivers the baskets to WCP after the meeting.

Victor-Farmington Rotary remembers the children at WCP during the Christmas season by providing them with Christmas stockings and gifts.

Rotary Headquarters recently told the club that 2017-18 Rotary International President-elect Ian H.S. Riseley, of Queensland, Australia, has selected “Rotary: Making a Difference” as the Rotary theme for the coming year.

“Whether we’re building a new playground or a new school, improving medical care or sanitation, training conflict mediators or midwives, we know that the work we do will change people’s lives — in ways large and small — for the better,” Riseley said.

Rotary’s founder, Paul Harris, once noted how he came to view Rotary’s role in the world.

“Individual effort may be turned to individual needs, but combined effort should be dedicated to the service of mankind,” Harris said. “The power of combined efforts knows no limitation.”

The organization that Harris founded in Chicago in 1905 has grown from a single club comprised of business and professional men into a worldwide organization of over 35,000 Rotary clubs and 1.2 million men and women who are dedicated to Rotary’s motto of “Service Above Self.”

At its club assembly in March, Victor-Farmington Rotary discussed plans for continuing its involvement in projects both locally and internationally to ensure they support the work of Rotary throughout the world.