A University of Rochester student has ended her hunger strike after six days. Lindsay Wrobel says she is satisfied with the steps the university is taking to fully investigate Professor Florian Jaeger.

A University of Rochester student has ended her hunger strike after six days.

Lindsay Wrobel says she is satisfied with the steps the university is taking to fully investigate Professor Florian Jaeger.

Jaeger has been accused in an EEOC filing, submitted by a group of fellow professors, of sexual harassment. In the filing, the professors claim Dr. Jaeger used his position of power to pursue sexual relationships with students.

Tuesday afternoon, the university's Board of Trustees said Jaeger has been put on leave and it had launched an independent investigation into the matter. Initially, the university had said it found the complaints to be based on hearsay.

"As of now I've been able to end the hunger strike," Wrobel told News10NBC on Tuesday.

"I actually cried in the car when I realized that I got to end this," Wrobel says. "That first bite of a cookie is probably the best thing I've ever tasted in my life."

Wrobel had no idea this issue was going to gain so much attention. She also didn't expect to hear from Florian Jaeger, the professor at the center of this firestorm. He emailed her on Tuesday.

"An email that was sort of saying I'm sorry for all the hate you've been getting on Twitter and it was like I think we need to protect the women who go through sexual abuse, but at the same time we need to protect the rights of the accused or whatever -- which was frustrating," Wrobel explains.

Wrobel is focusing more on what the University of Rochester's Board of Trustees is saying. It will conduct an independent investigation and also that Jaeger has been placed on administrative leave. But she says this is not over. "I am completely prepared to start it back up again if you know we find out the independent investigator is not independent or if certain things are not taken into account again -- like email and text evidence is not considered -- but this is a big enough step in the right direction."