The state's 92,000 volunteer firefighters have been fighting for this coverage for at least the last two years. State lawmakers approved the bill, but Governor Cuomo has yet to sign it.

"The governor should sign this bill because it's the right thing to do," says Diana Pfersick, volunteer firefighter.

Royer and Diana Pfersick sat down and talked with us Monday night about the presumptive cancer coverage bill. They have a combined 73 years of experience as volunteer firefighters. Royer has beaten bladder cancer twice. The first time everything was covered.

The second bout however... "The sad part about that was it wasn't covered then and we just had to deal with it," he says. "As a family, it was tough on us."

Royer's cancer isn't that unusual. Firefighters have a greater chance of developing certain cancers because of all the toxins and carcinogens they're exposed to fighting fires. The presumptive cancer bill would provide gap insurance and cover whatever a volunteer firefighter's regular insurance doesn't cover, like co-pays. The Pfersicks racked up thousands of dollars in bills just from co-pays.

"The paid firefighters already have a bill... coverage for themselves," says Royer. "So it's the right thing to do for the volunteers."

The state's 92,000 volunteer firefighters have been fighting for this coverage for at least the last two years. State lawmakers approved the bill, but Governor Cuomo has yet to sign it.

We asked the governor when he was in town a week ago whether he will sign the bill. He said, "The bill is under review now. Let me say, I'm favorably disposed to it."

"Somehow we feel left out...and no matter what's wrong when there's an emergency you call the fire department and we respond."