The Dignity for All Students Act, or DASA, requires districts to provide a safe environment free of harassment and bullying on school property. If you believe your child is not getting that, you should tell school administrators.

Last week we reported a story about a boy in kindergarten who was urinated on by another student at Rochester City School 44. That story is still sparking discussions about bullying in schools.

City school district officials say they have completed their investigation into what happened to that young boy, but they're not giving us any details.

Since the story aired, parents at home have reached out to us with bullying questions.

Every school district is required to have a bullying policy in writing; you can find that in the Code of Conduct. That policy says what the school should be doing to help your child in event of bullying, harassment or discrimination.

The Dignity for All Students Act, or DASA, requires districts to provide a safe environment free of harassment and bullying on school property. If you believe your child is not getting that, you should tell school administrators.

The best way to communicate after at least one verbal interaction is in writing. When parents send a letter or email to school officials, they must include a copy of that correspondence in a student’s file.

When school officials find out about bullying they are required to form a plan to address it in a timely manner.

Jonathan Falk, education attorney at the Legal Aid Society says the tricky part is finding an effective solution to the problem.

“Some effective means include have included hiring someone to accompany the student to make sure that if harassment or bullying is found the district is actually doing something,” Falk said. “Obviously those are districts that have a little more resources and for others that don't, the matter might fall through the cracks.”

Falk says bullying incidents are often swept under the rug or go unreported altogether. DASA requires school administrators to gather data of all bullying related incidents. The state keeps a database of all the issues.

As of Wednesday, the child who was allegedly urinated on is still being tutored at home. The mother says since the story went public, district officials have tried to reach out to her. Since she believes the district failed to act in a timely manner, she only wants to communicate through her lawyer. Her attorney is working on getting her son a permanent home tutor and counseling.