A print ad in the Super Bowl XLII souvenir program that's handed out at the game each year was rejected by the NFL. For several days, AMVETS and the NFL went back and forth over an ad that directly addressed the "take a knee" campaign.

A print ad in the Super Bowl XLII souvenir program that's handed out at the game each year was rejected by the NFL.

For several days, AMVETS and the NFL went back and forth over an ad that directly addressed the "take a knee" campaign.

AMVETS wanted to address it in a paid ad.

"It's important to us that people understand that we think they should stand for the flag," said Joe Chenelly, the AMVETS Executive Director who lives in Fairport.

AMVETS hoped to get this message across in a full page ad in the souvenir program book handed out at the Super Bowl each year. The NFL offered AMVETS a page when another ad buyer backed out at the last minute. But the ad AMVETS submitted didn't make the cut.

"We thought were being respectful," Chenelly said. "We weren't trying to club the NFL. We certainly weren't calling for a boycott or anything like that. But that this was important to our members and if we were going to be using our members hard earned money and donations, that we get a message out there that's really what our members wanted it to be."

This is the ad. It says "Please Stand" referring to the athlete protests during the National Anthem.

NFL Vice President of Communications Brian McCarthy issued a statement to News10NBC Monday night that it asked AMVETS to consider other options such as "please honor our veterans" or "please stand for our veterans."

McCarthy wrote that AMVETS then asked for a hashtag. When the answer was no to that, he says the NFL did not hear back from AMVETS before the publication deadline.

"They told us they didn't want to take a position on this issue," Chenelly said. "It's our opinion that they are taking a position by not allowing us to present two simple words here."

This was a $30,000 ad. McCarthy says you will see an ad by the Veteran of Foreign Wars.

"They stuck to their guns," Chenelly said. "We stuck to ours. We're not going to back down on this."

Chenelly said he will look to do ads with the NBA, NHL and NASCAR.