Trump met with a group of parents, lawmakers, and video game executives in the White House Thursday. He is calling on the industry to take a closer look at age restrictions on games after the Valentine's Day school shooting in Parkland.

Ninety percent of boys play violent video games by the time they get to high school.

After the most recent school shooting in Parkland, Florida, President Donald Trump has reignited the debate about the impact of violent video games. There have already been many studies conducted on this topic, and the Supreme Court ruled there is no connection between children who play violent video games and display violent behavior.

President Trump met with a group of parents, lawmakers, and video game executives in the White House Thursday. He is calling on the industry to take a closer look at age restrictions on games after the Valentine's Day school shooting in Parkland.

Director of the MAGIC Center at Rochester Institute of Technology Andrew Phelps says that's already been done.

"There's no relationship between playing COD (Call of Duty) and some of the tragedies that we have seen on TV," Phelps said. "The science is settled, this is not a thing."

Phelps says if there were a connection between playing these first shooter action games and increased violent behavior in children, it would be a problem globally.

"Call of Duty is a worldwide product," Phelps said. "We're only having this school shooting problem in America so clearly there's something else going on."

Dr. Stephen Cook, a pediatrician at University of Rochester Medical Center, suggests there could be a connection between young people seeing violence and showing violence.

"What they're experiencing is what it would be like to walk through a scene with a machine gun and fire at people," Dr. Cook said.

He also added recent research shows children who see violent behavior in movies were more likely to pick up a gun and pull the trigger. Dr. Cook says the games won't impact every child the same way, but for those already on the edge it could have a negative effect.

"Maybe they're already suffering from depression or anxiety or being bullied or teased, and this creates a sort of alternate reality that can be confused with true reality," Dr. Cook said.

The doctor would like to see more research on this topic from a larger sample group. He thinks gun violence should be studied as a public health concern.

"When we look at the data a research related to this, it is not the same as a randomized controlled plot," Dr. Cook said.

Dr. Cook says it's a good rule of thumb to limit your child to only a couple hours of video game play every day. He also recommends you play the games with your child to determine if it is appropriate for he or she to play.