The Rochester City School Board President says as the investigation into the death of 14-year old Trevyan Rowe continues, he expects the fallout to be severe. He says it is possible there will be criminal charges filed against the employee who altered Trevyan's attendance record for that day.

The Rochester City School Board President says as the investigation into the death of 14-year old Trevyan Rowe continues, he expects the fallout to be severe.

It’s been a week since Rowe, a 7th grader with autism, got off the school bus in front of School #12 in Rochester and wandered away. His body was recovered from the Genesee River on Sunday.

Rochester City School District School Board President Van White says he’s been on the phone with parents non-stop for the last week, “I think everyone is feeling somewhat vulnerable and when you have a system that impacts so many children, every one of our children, it's inevitable that people might wonder how it might impact them,” he tells News10NBC.

He’s says he’s getting a lot of questions about whether the issues that have come to light at School #12 in regards to attendance are widespread in the district. Three teachers are now on administrative leave after marking Rowe present when he never actually entered the school last Thursday. “From what we know, I don't think it can be said that the teachers that didn't press the absent button under any circumstance could be charged with something criminal,” White says.

There was one employee who took it a step further though, allegedly altering attendance records on Friday to try and cover up the errors, “I do think there's a possibility and I'm not a prosecutor anymore but I do think there's a possibility that the District Attorney or the Attorney General's office might want to investigate the circumstances under which we believe records were changed. In New York State, it's against the law to change business records to falsify business records,” White adds but clarifies it’ll be up to prosecutors to determine whether attendance records can legally be considered business records.

The Rochester Police Department tells News10NBC it is currently not participating in RCSD’s investigation. Monroe County District Attorney Sandra Doorley says she does not comment on the existence of pending investigations.

On Thursday, News10NBC also learned that the New York State Department of Education will have oversight in the independent investigation. In a statement, NYSED Spokeswoman Emily DeSantis says, "the investigation into the circumstances of this heartbreaking incident, appropriately, will be left to the proper law enforcement authorities.

The District Superintendents of our Monroe 1 & 2 BOCES and our Regional Special Education Technical Assistance Support Center will help the district review its school safety policies and procedures to determine what improvements need to be made in the wake of this tragedy to ensure the safety of all students going forward."