Facebook is apologizing over the Cambridge Analytica scandal, but more questions already surfacing about the company's collection of data after they admitted they keep track of your phone calls and text messages.

Facebook is apologizing over the Cambridge Analytica scandal, but more questions already surfacing about the company's collection of data after they admitted they keep track of your phone calls and text messages.

The company says the information is collected only from Android users who opt in to allow it, and that it is used only to improve your experience and help you to connect with people.

Some local users, however, don't see it that way.

"I think it's an invasion of privacy, completely," says Yuliana Poplavskiy, an avid Facebook user.

She and her friend Lili Dzundza are unhappy about Facebook's admission that it admits it collects data from your contact names and telephone numbers, as well as your call lengths and text messages.

"It's suppose to be private, you're having this app on your phone, you're not thinking they're collecting this data saved somewhere," she says.

The social media site says this info is kept on secure servers, but we wanted to know what users can do about it.

"Can you tell Facebook what it can and cannot do with your data? No, you agreed when you signed up to Facebook to share this data with them," says Mike Jhansson, a Senior Lecturer at RIT's School of Communications.

He says that Facebook is likely to face regulations in the near future because it is not doing a good job of protecting people's information, but in the meantime Johansson says you can go into your settings and create and archive of what Facebook has been collecting:

"You can download all of this data- phone numbers that you have collected, credit cards it's collected... having all of this. Then you what Facebook has collected and you can make an educated decision: Do I want to share all this information with Facebook? Do I want to be on Facebook?"

The current controversy affects Android users only who use Messenger or Facebook Lite. Facebook says you can opt-out in your settings, but it isn't easy to find: News10NBC searched for more than an hour and could not find it.

Facebook says that if you choose to opt out, all data that has been collected will be deleted.