When you're throwing back a shot, you probably aren't thinking about your liver.

Shocking statistics show more young adults are dying from liver disease and experts say alcohol is fueling the spike.

Fatal liver disease rates are increasing across the board, but for people aged 25 to 34, the increase is much greater.

A study from the British Medical Journal found the number of young people dying from liver disease nearly tripled between 1999 and 2016. Liver failure can be caused by several things like obesity or hepatitis C, but experts say this rise is happening because more young people are binge drinking.

In Monroe County, 27 percent of high school students reported drinking at least once within a month and 15 percent admitted to binge drinking, according to the latest Youth Risk Behavior survey.

When you're throwing back a shot, you probably aren't thinking about your liver, but Dr. Jeff Goldstein at Rochester Regional Health says you should start.

"When you look at alcohol it is considered a toxin, people use it recreationally," Dr. Goldstein says. "I'm not saying not to drink it ever. I'm just saying use it with caution because of the potential of alcohol-related and liver-related complications."

Dr. Goldstein says early warning signs of liver failure are yellowing of eyes and skin and pains in your stomach. The good news is liver disease is often reversible and many patients can recover if they stop drinking soon enough.