Deil says she isn't offended when someone says she hits, kicks or plays like a girl because she's just as tough as the boys.

One local young girl is hoping to spread an important message to other girls everywhere.

Eleven-year-old Alana Deil wants to let girls and women know they can break barriers.

"I can do whatever I want," Deil says. "It doesn't matter if I'm a girl or a boy.

Deil says she isn't offended when someone says she hits, kicks or plays like a girl because she's just as tough as the boys.

"I love to play soccer, I like synchronized swimming, and I want to learn to play football," Deil says.

When she talks about football at school, the boys doubt and question why she'd want to play. Sometimes girls question it too, but that doesn't stop her from trying. A special woman in her life already did something similar.

"In 1995, my aunt had won the Greater Rochester Soap Box Derby and she was the first female to do it," Deil says.

When her aunt, Elyse Deil, was 11 years old she shattered a glass ceiling she didn't know existed.

"I didn't really realize it was a male-dominated sport," Elyse says. "I knew I wanted to do it and I thought it would be fun for me and my dad to put the car together."

Other girls went on to compete and win the derby after Elyse did. Her pictures, trophy, and hat will soon be on display at the Strong Museum of Play.

"It makes me feel honored to be in the museum, and also hopefully, to continue to inspire young girls to go out and continue to achieve whatever they desire," Elyse says.

Deil hopes to one day compete in the derby herself, using her aunt's achievement as a constant reminder that the future is female.

"I want to let women and girls know they can accomplish anything that's seen as male-dominated and they can do whatever their heart desires," Deil says.

The curators at the Strong Museum are working on building the display for Elyse's soap box derby items.