Jodie Romeiser allegedly ran a stop sign and seriously injured 2 men while under the influence of a prescription drug

CANANDAIGUA — For two days, an Ontario County jury has listened to an intense trial over a woman charged with vehicular assault based upon the level of prescription medication in her bloodstream.

Jodie Romeiser, 55, is in court for allegedly running a stop sign on Sept. 15, 2016 and t-boning and seriously injuring two men while being influenced by the prescribed drug tramadol.

According to Ontario County Assistant District Attorney Nathan Thomas, on Sept. 15 at approximately 10:15 a.m. Romeiser left a doctor's appointment showing no effects of the prescribed opioid. Then, at 11 a.m. at the intersection of Nott and Middle Cheshire roads in the Town of Canandaigua, according to Thomas, she rolled through the stop sign because she had taken her medication — smashing into and seriously injuring the two occupants who for the rest of their lives will experience a 15 percent disability.

Romeiser’s defense attorney, Delton Caraway from the Ontario County Public Defender’s office, does not dispute that his client ran the stop sign. He contends that the incident was an unfortunate accident and nothing more. His client was within her legal rights based upon her medical prescription, Caraway contended.

Ontario County Judge Frederick Reed sent the jury into deliberations on two counts of vehicular assault (one for each victim), driving while ability impaired by drugs, and two counts of third-degree assault with a vehicle (one for each victim).

There were two people in the vehicle that Romeiser's vehicle struck. Initially, they were released from the hospital that day. The men returned to the hospital later, where a variety of injuries were discovered, including rib and knee injuries that will affect them the rest of their lives, said Thomas.

According to court testimony, Romeiser had a blood level of .378 in her system, which is consistent within the range of a therapeutic dose; however, according to the prosecution, even a legitimate dose off of a prescription can cause impairment significant enough to be charged legally.

If found guilty, Romeiser faces a potential sentence of one to three years at minimum and two and a third to seven years at maximum.