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Wayne Post
Who is this 'Iron Belle'?
Different and Alike
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About this blog
By Kerry M. Davis
Hey there, my name is Kerry (that’s me in the picture up there) glad you are here. I have been a health nut for a while but never truly realized my passion for it until a few years ago. I have been a massage therapist for over ten years and known ...
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Chronicles of an Iron Belle
Hey there, my name is Kerry (that’s me in the picture up there) glad you are here. I have been a health nut for a while but never truly realized my passion for it until a few years ago. I have been a massage therapist for over ten years and known for my ability to ‘torture’ people. The CIA wasn’t hiring so I pursued an Infant Massage Therapy certification in an attempt to figure out when things start going awry as we develop and stopping them before they cause trouble when we are adults. Person after person would come to me seeking relief from their pain and all I could do was iron it out with a massage, the rest of the work was up to them and I soon found that not too many go to the gym and know what to do or have a personal trainer who gives them a good program. A major contributor to this issue is the lack of communication from the client to the professional out of ignorance of their own body all because we are so busy with the other demands of life to even listen to what our body is telling us. This blog will give you that understanding.

All that background stuff brought me to today: a certified personal trainer who LOVES kettlebell training (my fave move is the Turkish Get Up), loves running, and loves acting like a kid (I have three!). I hope you enjoy the journey with me as we tackle understanding our bodies and how to get the most of your time at the gym, beat injury, figure out what muscles are doing what, and have a few laughs along the way. Understand that I am a massage therapist and personal trainer, not a medical doctor so the advice I share here is strictly that: advice. To see the kind of work I do (with my hunk of a hubby) click here.

Please drop me a line though, I would love to hear all about you!

Take care,

Kerry M. Davis LMT, CIMT, CPT
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July 18, 2012 12:01 a.m.

I recently returned from a road trip to Florida.  I have some friends and family there and wanted to spend some time with them.  I enjoy the scenery and capturing it with my camera along the way.  I have to say though that this was probably the last time my car will be transporting me on that far a trip.  My body doesn't take to long road trips like it used to, and the flight takes about 3 hours compared to 22 hours or so by car.
I find it very interesting how many subcultures exist in this country.  And taking a 1,300 mile car trip is one sure-fire way to witness a few of them.  When you travel that far you have to stop fairly often, for gas, food and rest rooms if you like to drink coffee as much as I do, so you meet a lot of people.  I tend to be a very observant person, so I notice details.  I like to challenge myself to pick up on differences as well as consistencies along the way.
You don't have to go too far to experience a difference in speech.  As close as Pennsylvania,  a subtle accent can be heard, and also different words for familiar things like "soda" instead of our western New York "pop."  Then further south like in Virginia the accent is obvious, and responses to questions and inquiries from travelers such as myself are most commonly completed with "ma'am."  That's when I know I'm way out of my neighborhood!
When you get that far south and beyond, another very obvious difference surfaces - the pace.  It does absolutely no good to try and rush in anything when in the southern part of the country. Toll booth operators, cashiers, food servers and other service-people are laid back, and they generally don't appreciate customers trying to "hurry them up."  They can spot a "yankee" a mile away by our accent (although I've never thought of myself as having one), and of course our pace.
In order to have a pleasant trip, I had to adjust my perspective a little.  It's easy to jump to conclusions that the people that serve us are being inconsiderate or rude, but that's not usually the case.  It's quite the contrary.  They are being friendly and courteous, and to them that means taking their time with each customer.  When I stop to think about it, that's the way I say I want to be treated.  I'm just usually in too much of a hurry to let them.

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