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Wayne Post
  • Pucko's Perspective: More than winning, it’s about being there

  • Sports are best when it isn’t all about wins and losses. Like at Greece Arcadia High School. During any boys varsity basketball game, look down to the end of the bench and you’ll find a young man wearing number 32 in an Arcadia uniform. That’s Adam Boyce.

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  • Sports are best when it isn’t all about wins and losses. Like at Greece Arcadia High School.
    During any boys varsity basketball game, look down to the end of the bench and you’ll find a young man wearing number 32 in an Arcadia uniform. That’s Adam Boyce.
    “He wanted it, and I’m like, of course you can have it,” said basketball coach Roger Klimek. “He really wanted to play sports and unfortunately he couldn’t. He feels he’s part of the team and shows it by putting the uniform on every day.”
    At age 5, Adam was diagnosed with muscular dystrophy, a childhood disease for which there is no cure. But Boyce is doing better than most in his situation.
    “He’s very lucky,” says his dad, Ron Boyce. “He’s still walking. Most boys with muscular dystrophy are in wheelchairs by age 11 or 12. He’s 19 now so we’ve enjoyed a lot of bonus years with him being able to walk.”
    Part of what keeps Adam going is his involvement with the Arcadia sports teams. He began managing the football team in middle school and has since expanded his involvement with the Titans. Boyce graduated from Greece Arcadia two years ago.
    “I’ve been doing it for four years now and it feels pretty fun,” said Adam. “It makes me feel good because two years ago as a senior I got inducted into the Sports Hall of Fame at the school. I’ve been doing it ever since then and hopefully doing it again.”
    That attachment to sports teams got Adam through high school.
    “He worked hard at school,” said Ron, “but only because he could be at practice after school and be with the guys. The athletes in the school really supported him beyond our wildest dreams.”
    The Boyce family was dealt a difficult hand. Adam’s condition will continue to deteriorate. But blessings come in various forms.
    “When your son is diagnosed at age 5 you don’t know what to expect,” says his dad. “You’re thinking the worst, of him being bullied at school and not having friends, and it’s been just the opposite of that. The student body and the faculty at that school have been unbelievable, giving him opportunities to be part of things.”
    Like managing the basketball team.
    “He’s taken it as far as he possibly can. He’s there every minute of every practice, of every game, living every win and living every loss just like the guys. It’s a dream come true.”
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