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Wayne Post
  • Cauliflower: A Common Cruciferous

  • The leaves have fallen from the trees, the clocks have turned back, and for many, that means it is time for soups and stews. Many of the cruciferous vegetables we enjoy fresh all summer make excellent ingredients for these fall creations.

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  • The leaves have fallen from the trees, the clocks have turned back, and for many, that means it is time for soups and stews. Many of the cruciferous vegetables we enjoy fresh all summer make excellent ingredients for these fall creations.
    Cauliflower, available in New York through the fall, is a versatile vegetable that can be roasted, boiled, steamed, and eaten raw. It is low in fat and carbohydrates, but high in dietary fiber, folate, and vitamin C. It has a high nutritional density, meaning that it provides substantial amounts of vitamins and minerals and relatively few calories. Cauliflower is usually white, but can also be found in orange, green and purple. Children often like discovering vegetables with these unique colors. Keep cauliflower loosely wrapped in plastic in the fridge. Fresh from the market heads will last up to 2 weeks.
    Visit a local farmers’ market or farm stand, to find cauliflower and additional produce in order to Eat3 — Eat Well, Eat Local, and Eat Together. As part of the Farmers’ Market Nutrition Outreach Program, Cornell Cooperative Extension provides delicious ways to Eat3 throughout the year.
    Families are encouraged to visit the Eat3 website at, www.eat3.org. The website features seasonal recipes with nutrition information and tips. In addition, information is available to help families who receive SNAP benefits, WIC Farmers’ Market Nutrition Program checks, and WIC Vegetable and Fruit Checks use food resources at local farmers markets.
    When families Eat Well, Eat Local and Eat Together, they tend to eat more nutritiously — meals have more fruits, vegetables, and whole grains, and fewer soft drinks. Buying locally-produced foods means your dollars stay within the local community. Buying from local farmers supports the local economy and helps land stay productive.
    Cornell Cooperative Extension provides food and nutrition education in a variety of agriculture, 4-H and nutrition venues, such as farmers’ markets, county fairs, health and wellness events, community garden programs, and nutrition education programs and through county newsletters.
    The Meal of the Month for November features a delicious stew. The recipe is below and can also be found on www.eat3.org.
    Indian-Spiced Eggplant & Cauliflower Stew
    1 pound of eggplant, cut into 1-inch chunks
    3 cups cauliflower florets
    1 large onion
    1 15-ounce can of unsalted diced tomatoes
    1 15-ounce can of chickpeas, rinsed
    1/2 cup water
    2 Tbsp. curry powder
    1 tsp. ground cumin
    1 tsp. ground mustard seeds
    11/2 Tbsp. canola or vegetable oil
    2 cloves of garlic, minced
    1 tsp. grated ginger
    3/4 tsp. salt
    1/2 cup nonfat plain yogurt (optional)
    Directions
    1.    Toast the curry powder, cumin and mustard seeds in a pot over medium heat, stirring for about 1 minute until the spices begin to darken. Transfer to a small bowl.
    Page 2 of 2 - 2.    Add oil, onion, garlic, ginger and salt to the pot. Stir for 3-4 minutes until softened.
    3.    Stir in eggplant, cauliflower, tomatoes, chickpeas, water, and reserved spices. Bring to a simmer.
    4.    Top each serving with a dollop of yogurt, if desired.
    Makes: 6 servings
    Seared Sugar Snap Peas
    1 pound sugar snap peas, strings removed
    3-4 scallions or green onions, sliced diagonally
    1 Tbsp. olive or vegetable oil
    Dash of salt
    Pinch of sugar
    Zest of 1 lemon
    3 Tbsp. chopped fresh mint
    Black pepper to taste
    Lemon juice to taste
    Directions
    1.    Heat a large sautÈ pan on high heat for 1 minute. Add the oil to the pan and heat until it simmers, about 1-2 minutes.
    2.    Add the sugar snap peas and toss to coat with oil. Sprinkle with a pinch of salt and toss again. Allow to cook undisturbed for 1 minute.
    3.    Add the green onions and sprinkle with a pinch of sugar. Toss to combine. Let cook for 1 minute. Toss and cook again undisturbed for 2 minutes.
    4.    Remove heat and mix in lemon zest and mint.
    5.    Add black pepper and lemon juice to taste.
    6.    Serve and enjoy!
    Makes: 4 servings
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