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Wayne Post
Who is this 'Iron Belle'?
Help! My dog is afraid of thunder and fireworks!
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About this blog
By Kerry M. Davis
Hey there, my name is Kerry (that’s me in the picture up there) glad you are here. I have been a health nut for a while but never truly realized my passion for it until a few years ago. I have been a massage therapist for over ten years and known ...
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Chronicles of an Iron Belle
Hey there, my name is Kerry (that’s me in the picture up there) glad you are here. I have been a health nut for a while but never truly realized my passion for it until a few years ago. I have been a massage therapist for over ten years and known for my ability to ‘torture’ people. The CIA wasn’t hiring so I pursued an Infant Massage Therapy certification in an attempt to figure out when things start going awry as we develop and stopping them before they cause trouble when we are adults. Person after person would come to me seeking relief from their pain and all I could do was iron it out with a massage, the rest of the work was up to them and I soon found that not too many go to the gym and know what to do or have a personal trainer who gives them a good program. A major contributor to this issue is the lack of communication from the client to the professional out of ignorance of their own body all because we are so busy with the other demands of life to even listen to what our body is telling us. This blog will give you that understanding.

All that background stuff brought me to today: a certified personal trainer who LOVES kettlebell training (my fave move is the Turkish Get Up), loves running, and loves acting like a kid (I have three!). I hope you enjoy the journey with me as we tackle understanding our bodies and how to get the most of your time at the gym, beat injury, figure out what muscles are doing what, and have a few laughs along the way. Understand that I am a massage therapist and personal trainer, not a medical doctor so the advice I share here is strictly that: advice. To see the kind of work I do (with my hunk of a hubby) click here.

Please drop me a line though, I would love to hear all about you!

Take care,

Kerry M. Davis LMT, CIMT, CPT
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By Palmyra Animal Hospital
June 28, 2012 12:01 a.m.


As July Fourth approaches and thunderstorms are bound to hit, many pet owners need help with their dog’s noise phobia. Among our pooches, this is a common problem that can cause them to hide, try to escape, vocalize, pant, pace, tremble and even have an “accident” indoors. Behaviors will often vary, but once a phobia of loud noises has been recognized, environmental and behavioral changes or drugs and pheromones can help to reduce or eliminate this fear. 


 


Behavioral modification means retraining the dog to reduce his or her fear of storms and it can often involve diverting your pet’s attention. You could do this by playing audio tapes to gradually train the dog to accept the sounds associated with thunder or by engaging in activities such as fetch or sit and stay. Rewarding the dog’s appropriate response with petting or soothing can reinforce that negative behavior and can increase the dog’s anxiety.  


 


You could also consider changing the dog’s environment. For this method, your dog can be placed in a darkened, windowless room with music or white noise playing. If you do this, it is important to still keep an eye on the dog to ensure he doesn’t unintentionally do harm to himself because of his anxiousness.


 


Additionally, certain drugs, depending on the dog’s age and health, can help anxious pets. It is best to consult your veterinarian to learn which choice is the best fit. Some options include anti-anxiety medications as well as Pheromones, which are chemicals produced in small amounts that only a particular species can detect but that have a calming effect on the dog.


 


With the right combination of therapies, this frustrating phobia can be managed. Of course, it is best to talk about this concern with your veterinarian, who will be familiar with your dog’s specific health and history.


 


Have a safe and happy Independence Day!

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