The next museum we are discussing is the Palmyra Print Shop which numbers four  in our museum complex. The Palmyra Print Shop was a plan since the beginning of the Phelps Restoration project in 1977. Many printing presses with special ties to Palmyra were found and brought to this small shop to wait for the next step. How special, were they to Palmyra and why do we need a printing shop?

Heritage Weekend is behind us and what a success it was. Historic Palmyra brought in over 200 folks from all over to visit. We had the Rochester Museum and Art group share in our museums and history as well as a biking group traveling the Erie Canal towpath planning their stop just to visit the museums. Historic Palmyra also held a program on May 17 to discuss the War of 1812 and its affect on Palmyra and vicinity and how our current display is relating to that war. I would like to thank all the Temple missionaries for their amazing help hanging the coverlets along with a number of Historic Palmyra board members.   

The next museum we are discussing is the Palmyra Print Shop which numbers four  in our museum complex. The Palmyra Print Shop was a plan since the beginning of the Phelps Restoration project in 1977. Many printing presses with special ties to Palmyra were found and brought to this small shop to wait for the next step. How special, were they to Palmyra and why do we need a printing shop?

These presses and cutters were manufactured right in Palmyra on West Jackson Street to the west of the fairgrounds from 1856 to 1923 supplying many jobs and memories to many grandparents and great grandparents that work there. The Alling Coverlet had been the Palmyra Courier since 1901. A very big connection to the printing industry right here in Palmyra. There seemed to be too many presses, cutters, and type cases; and another place was needed to store them all. Of course, one of our members had a barn which seemed an appropriate place to store the behemoths. After our Phelps project and collection room to the tune of $300,000 floor footers, and support beams  and  a new base beam and flooring, all was in order to layout a print shop. Now we had four museums.    

We can tell history through print blocks, type, type cases, and so many other unique and interesting ways to communicate on paper. The Peerless Press heads the line in our collection made in Palmyra in 1871, with the Ben Franklin Gordon not far behind. The Peerless cutter is a sizeable piece that could cut off just about anything. It was used with large compressed reams of paper. The typewriters tell a story of progress and invention and the type blocks tell an even more amazing history of our community through the maps and pictures that had been put in the paper. The maps would tell you where to vote in the district and it was put in the paper.

The folks had to be informed about the new high school built in 1953 so the Palmyra Courier Journal made a layout of that on a type stamp to place in the newspaper. Photographs came from type stamps that were etched into a type block. All that was read used to be printed using ink and a press of some type. Unless you took pen to paper, of course, then it was written by hand. The progress we have made in this art of printing is amazing.  
 
From Lithograph stones to individual type and then linotype the stories of America have been told. We have recently lost a great printer who lived and worked in Ovid, Wayne Morrison, had been a printer all his life and continued to print, study printing, and talk about presses and cutters. He will be missed by any that knew him and his great work. Many of the books carried in the Alling Shop were printed by Wayne Morrison. We would like to dedicate this article to our friend Wayne. Call 597-6981 or visit www.historicpalmyrany.com.