Fleas might not seem like that big of a deal in the grand scheme of life. However, they can be responsible for serious problems in your pet’s health, and as the temperatures continue to rise, they pose even more of a challenge. Here are some examples of problems fleas can cause:

Fleas might not seem like that big of a deal in the grand scheme of life. However, they can be responsible for serious problems in your pet’s health, and as the temperatures continue to rise, they pose even more of a challenge. Here are some examples of problems fleas can cause: Intense itching due to a pet’s sensitivity (allergy) to flea bites. This can cause hair loss and more scratching, which can damage the skin and lead to infection. Anemia, especially with cats, because of the fleas’ blood-sucking behavior. This anemia has caused death in cats.  Tapeworm, if a flea is ingested during grooming. Appearing as rice-like segments in the stool or around the rear end, tapeworm can sometimes be seen moving on bedding. Diseases transmitted to people. These diseases would include cat scratch fever, bubonic plague and typhus. It is recommended that owners check their pets for fleas at least once or twice a week using a flea comb. Sometimes fleas can be found on the comb but more often flea dirt is found.  These pepper-like specks of flea feces will turn red when wetted with water.  Flea combing is especially important in cats as they seldom scratch when flea bitten, unless they are affected by a flea allergy.   

Treating fleas can take a lot of effort, so it is easier to prevent fleas rather than treat them after an infestation. Many options exist in terms of external parasite preventives, so it is recommended to consult your veterinarian for option that best fits your lifestyle and your pet’s risk.